Start Up Blog

The system is dead

Posted in entrepreneurship by Steve Sammartino on September 26, 2011

Journalism is dead. No, newspapers are dying. Writing has never been more omnipresent or important.

The music industry is dead. No, more artists are making more music. It’s just not in a record store.

TV is dead. No, TV is different. ‘t now has 6 billion channels with www. addresses rather than 200 numbers to choose from.

Advertising is dead. No, we no longer “tell then sell”. We now collaborate and create before hand. The 4th P is now the 1st.

Print production is dead. No, we print on our desktop. We print millions more pages than ever.

Book stores are dead. No, stories and reading continue to grow via the screen and home delivered books.

Retail is dead. No, it’s growing rapidly. In different places, in different ways, all digitally augmented.

The point is that anything that is culturally or economically important will never die. Humans will find new ways to keep them alive, or more truthfully make them more alive by knocking down the previous barriers to entry held in place but the profitable incumbents. They loved their systems because it made them rich from keeping us out.

My question to all entrepreneurs is this; how are we making the most of the change old dying systems are presenting us?

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3 Responses

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  1. Mike Boyd said, on October 3, 2011 at 9:15 am

    Brilliant perspective.

    Mike (@mikeboyd via twitter)

  2. Vinson | Printer Repair said, on October 8, 2011 at 9:31 pm

    Are you pertaining to worldwide scenario? because in my country which is a third world country some of the things that you have said was dead does not apply. For instance newspaper in my country is very much alive, because not all of the people have access to internet, or can’t watch what’s happening on time to time so they rely on newspaper.

    • Steve Sammartino said, on October 10, 2011 at 4:41 pm

      Yes, I am mainly referring to 1st world countries. I understand that it does very greatly depending on the economic / social circumstances of each particular country. Thanks for pointing this out.
      Steve.


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